Sponsored: Educational Toy Online Store

This post may contain affiliate links which help support my family. Thank you for stopping by.

Educational Toy Online Store

Educational Toy Online Store

Finding a decent educational toys online store can sometimes prove tricky. There are so many different options and finding one that actually delivers can be a nightmare.

I stumbled across DH Gate a few years ago when we started homeschooling and have ordered from them on a few occasions with no hassles and received good service from them.

I am a firm believer that education should be taught using practical and sensory methods. In my opinion, it helps to cement the new concept. I have noticed the kidlets use their hands to mimic the work we have done on certain topics, like times tables. I have always used manipulatives and sensory activities in our lessons and the kidlets have always found that by using these manipulatives or sensory methods has helped my kidlets quite a bit.

Here are some of my favourite finds for Mathematics, Science and Language Arts.

Mathematics

Wooden Counting Sticks
Educational Toys Online Store

Geometry Blocks Set
Educational Toys Online Store

1-100 Digit Square
Educational Toys Online Store

Wooden Balance Scale
Educational Toys Online Store

Science

Life Cycle of Corn Specimen, Resin Embedded
Educational Toys Online Store

Insects Magnification Cup Amplifier Tank
Educational Toys Online Store

Twin Live Steam Engine Model Kit
Educational Toys Online Store

Language Arts

100Pcs Set Wooden Scrabble Tiles
Educational Toys Online Store

Alphabet Wooden Puzzle
Educational Toys Online Store

Literacy Fun Game
Educational Toys Online Store

Digital Alphabet Letters A~Z Alphabetical & 0~9 Numerical Soft EVA Foam Mats
Educational Toys Online Store

Curriculum Choices 2018

This post may contain affiliate links which help support my family. Thank you for stopping by.

curriculum choices 2018

curriculum choices 2018
I’m often asked what our Curriculum Choices are for this year. In short, we follow the Cambridge International Primary Curriculum for our core subjects. We then added a few other programs that suit us and the kidlets’ learning styles. We are currently in our 3rd year of using this curriculum and are very happy with it.
curriculum choices 2018
In addition to the Core Cambridge Primary curriculum, I also purchased the Keys to Learning Boxes for each child. I use them as reinforcement as the kidlets are all visual learners and this has helped us quite a bit to get the concepts ingrained.

Keys to Learning focuses on basic literacy, numeracy and mathematics skills, and can be used for the consolidation of skills in the mainstream classroom – as well as for remedial work at earlier levels.
Click on the image below to find out more about the Keys to Learning program.
curriculum choices 2018

Koko is currently doing the Stage 5 curriculum. These are the books he is currently working on. We use a combination of Cambridge for the core subjects and the CAPS (the South African curriculum):

English
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Activity book

 

 

 

 

Phonics in a Box Workbook. We use this book for dictionary work.

 

 

 

 

Mathematics
Teachers Manual

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Games book

 

 

 

 

Science
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Activity book

 

 

 

 

Life Skills
CAPS Workbook

Afrikaans
CAPS Workbook

Fifi is currently doing the Stage 3 curriculum. These are the books she is currently working on. We use a combination of Cambridge for the core subjects and the CAPS (the South African curriculum):

English
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Activity book

 

 

 

 

Phonics in a Box Workbook. We use this book for dictionary work.

 

 

 

 

Mathematics
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Games book

 

 

 

 
Science
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Activity book

 

 

 

 

Life Skills
CAPS Workbook

Afrikaans
CAPS Workbook

Pixie is currently doing the Stage 1 curriculum. These are the books she is currently working on. We use a combination of Cambridge for the core subjects and the CAPS (the South African curriculum):

English
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 
Activity book

 

 

 

 

Phonics Workbook B. She completed Workbook A last year.

 

 

 

 
Phonics in a Box Workbook.

 

 

 

 
Mathematics
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 
Learners Book

 

 

 

 
Games book

 

 

 

 
Science
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 
Learners Book

 

 

 

 
Activity book

 

 

 

 
Life Skills
CAPS Workbook

Afrikaans
CAPS Workbook

The girls are currently using the Rainbow Reading Curriculum.

Rainbow Reading is a graded reading series for primary schools. It provides a wealth of original stories and factual texts, which will help learners to develop the reading skills and vocabulary they need to meet the requirements of the curriculum in all learning areas. All 350 titles in the series are written by South African authors. Rainbow Reading motivates young readers to become fluent readers, because it allows them to choose stories that they want to read and to read at their own level.

Fifi is currently using Rainbow Reading Level 3.

The books in Level 3 can be used in any grade in the Foundation Phase, but they are best suited to seven- to nine-year-old learners in Grade 2 or Grade 3. Many of the learners will be learning English as a First Additional Language. Most children at this level have started to read and some may be reading quite well already. They should be able to recognise sight words and decode unfamiliar words.

Level 3 Rainbow Reading books are 16 pages long. The stories are based on familiar objects and actions and the characters include children typical of those in the target age group. The artwork is a very important part of each text at this level, as it supports reading and helps the emerging readers to make sense of the stories. The artwork provides cludes, which help the readers to decode and recognise words. Text is consistently placed to help learners to become confident about reading books.

There are three types of texts at this level:

Read Aloud stories (fiction) 250-400 total words
Read Alone stories (fiction) 250-400 total words
Factual (non-fiction) texts 250-400 total words
Each boxed set in Level 3 contains a comprehensive teacher’s guide, which provides valuable support for teaching reading and book skills, and includes specific support for each title, including phonics, oral skills, high-frequency words and key oral vocabulary, as well as suggested activities.”

Pixie is currently using Rainbow Reading Level 1/.

The books in Rainbow Reading Level 1 can be used in any grade in the Foundation Phase, but they are best suited to five- and six-year-old learners in Grade R or Grade 1. Many of the learners will be learning English as a First Additional Language. Most children at this level will not be able to read by themselves in any language, and some of the children will be handling books for the first time.

Level 1 Rainbow Reading books are eight pages long. The stories are based on familiar objects and actions and the characters include children typical of those in the target age group. The artwork is very important part of each text at this level, as it supports reading and helps the emerging readers to make sense of the stories. The pictures tell the story. Text is consistently placed to help learners become confident about reading books.

There are three types of texts at this level:

Read Aloud stories (fiction) Maximum 50 words
Read Alone stories (fiction) Maximum 20 words
Factual (non-fiction) texts Maximum 20 words
Each boxed set in Level 1 contains a comprehensive teacher’s guide, which provides valuable support for teaching reading skills, and includes specific support for each title, including phonics, oral skills, high-frequency words and key oral vocabulary, as well as suggested activities.”

History is a group lesson here. We use the Story of the World curriculum and love it. We work through each chapter thoroughly and have sometimes spent a month on a chapter that may only be 2 pages long. I let the children drive this part of our lessons as they generally ask a ton of more indepth questions than I expect.

Each Friday, the kidlets do a research project, these often take up to 3 weeks to complete (depending on the work). They choose the topic and we work together to get all the information for them. They then create a poster of all they have learned. So far we have learned about the food pyramid, the importance of vitamins and kangaroos. Our next project is Fifi’s choice.

One of the first questions we get asked is, “Do your children do exams and assessments?” The easy answer is yes. I download the Annual National Assessments from the Department of Basic Education’s website. The kidlets do them and I mark them. I have these on hand should we ever need them for some reason.

The Annual National Assessments (ANA) are standardised national assessments for languages and mathematics in the senior phase (grades 7 – 9), intermediate phase (grades 4 – 6) and in literacy and numeracy for the foundation phase (grades 1 – 3). The question papers and marking memoranda (exemplars) are supplied by the national Department of Basic Education and the schools manage the conduct of the tests as well as the marking and internal moderation.

With regards to exams, we don’t do official exams. The kidlets are assessed as to their knowledge during each lesson, if they don’t understand the concept of the lesson, we don’t move on. That is one HUGE benefit of homeschooling. Once all the work for the year has been completed, we move onto the next grade.

I also often get asked about the legalities of homeschooling in South Africa. I am not a lawyer and don’t pretend to have the answers. My suggestion is that you visit the Pestalozzi Trust website. They have all the information available to the public.

monstered_sig

 

 

Privacy and Disclosure

 

 

Exploring the Sci-Bono Discovery Centre

This post may contain affiliate links which help support my family. Thank you for stopping by.

The Sci-Bono Discovery Centre is an extraordinary, all-weather family destination situated in the vibrant and safe precinct of Newtown, Johannesburg.
Sci-Bono
With more than 350 interactive maths, science and technology exhibits it is the largest and most visited science centre in Southern Africa. In addition to the hundreds of exhibits it also offers a wide range of leisure and educational activities and events.

Koko recently finished building a clay scale model of the solar system and to finish off the astonomy theme science lessons, we took our group to Sci-Bono Discovery Centre.
Sci-Bono
The kids loved it. There are so many interactive exhibitions that the kidlets were a little overwhelmed. We did, however, have a guided tour and our tour guide was wonderful with the children.

The kidlets loved the Microsoft exhibition. Koko played on the Kinect and the girls alternated between the laptops and the tablets.
Sci-Bono
Our favourite interactive exhibition, by far, was the Mind Ball game.
Sci-Bono
Koko couldn’t relax enough and eventually got frustrated sitting there watching the ball roll towards him. We could see immediately when he started over thinking and eventually lost. He wanted to go again, but there just wasn’t time.
Sci-Bono
Fifi and Daniel drew a tie (they hit the time limit). Daniel was amazing, I’ve never seen such focus from a 7 year old in my entire life! Watching his brainwaves on the monitor fascinated me. Fifi was concentrating so hard, she stopped breathing and went red in the face! Silly girl. These two monsters had us all in awe with their determination to win. They were thrilled that they had tied!

Mindball is a two-person game controlled by players’ brain waves in which players compete to control a ball’s movement across a table by becoming more relaxed and focused. Mindball is produced by the Swedish Company Interactive Productline. The concept, introduced in 2003, originates from the prototype Brainball which was developed by Smart Studio at The Interactive Institute, also in Sweden.

We were treated by a science experiement show by the Sci-Bono resident scientist. The kids loved watching things explode, change colour and expand. Watching these little faces in awe of what you can do with “simple” ingredients had me worried we might have explosions going off of home, LOL, but they were expressly told that they were not to try any of these at home. Thankfully Koko is a very careful child, so I don’t have to worry about that and Fifi and Pixie weren’t that interested until he made a helium balloon explode!
Sci-Bono
Once our group left, we spent a further 2 hours just exploring the centre and all the exhibitions. Even with 4 huge school buses arriving full of school children, we had plenty of space to explore and didn’t have to wait for turns at the exhibitions.

All in all, we highly recommend this facility. Its educational AND loads of fun!

Sci-Bono

The Sci-Bono Discovery Centre, Southern Africa’s largest science centre, is affiliated to the Gauteng Department of Education to support maths, science and technology education and to help build to South Africa’s science, engineering and technology capacity. Sci-Bono is responsible for implementing the Gauteng Mathematics, Science and Technology Education Strategy.

Sci-Bono started as a partnership project of the Gauteng Department of Education and various private sector partners. Located in the historic Electric Workshop in the cultural precinct of Newtown, Johannesburg, Sci-Bono annually receives hundreds of thousands of visitors to its a large collection of interactive science and technology exhibits and exhibitions. Sci-Bono also offers a broad programme of science and technology related events, activities and programmes for both the general public and the school community. Sci-Bono is now one of the most popular leisure and educational destinations in Gauteng.

Sci-Bono is a Non-Profit Company funded by its principal, the Gauteng Department of Education, It also benefits from grants and donations from donors in the broader public and private sector. Sci-Bono is also supported by various scientific and engineering bodies in industry and by the diplomatic community in South Africa.

To rent a car with Around About Cars and explore this incredible region of South Africa click here: Car Rental South Africa

monstered_sig

 

 

Privacy and Disclosure

Freebie Friday Linkup: Science – Anatomy Resources

This post may contain affiliate links which help support my family. Thank you for stopping by.

freebie friday 2015

Science – Anatomy Resources

Top 10 Anatomy Coloring Pages For Your Toddler from Mom Junction
Anatomy Resources

Science Paper Model – Brain Atlas Free Paper Craft Download from PaperCraftSquare
Anatomy Resources
This science paper model is a Brain Atlas, the papercraft was created by soilshop.

from 3 Boys and a Dog
Anatomy Resources
Last week, we had an awesome time learning about the skeletal system! We are super excited about the muscular system this week, aren’t you? As with last week, we aren’t getting into the scientific names of the muscles, but are learning what they do for the body.

Human Skeleton from Crayola
Anatomy Resources
Use the word bank to identify parts of the human skeleton.

Human Skeleton Diagram Labelling Sheets from Early Learning HQ
Anatomy Resources
A detailed diagram of the human skeleton with space for children to label each of the major bones.

Valentine’s Day Heart Resources for Science Lessons from The Whiteboard Blog
Anatomy Resources
This resource from The Wellcome Trust provides some interactive activities, and lesson resources for teaching about the heart and the effect of exercise. Lots of other body resources there too.

Kidney Filtration from How Stuff Works Health
Anatomy Resources
In the nephron, approximately 20 percent of the blood gets filtered under pressure through the walls of the glomerular capillaries and Bowman’s capsule. The filtrate is composed of water, ions (sodium, potassium, chloride), glucose and small proteins (less than 30,000 daltons — a dalton is a unit of molecular weight). The rate of filtration is approximately 125 ml/min or 45 gallons (180 liters) each day. Considering that you have 7 to 8 liters of blood in your body, this means that your entire blood volume gets filtered approximately 20 to 25 times each day! Also, the amount of any substance that gets filtered is the product of the concentration of that substance in the blood and the rate of filtration. So the higher the concentration, the greater the amount filtered or the greater the filtration rate, the more substance gets filtered.

Powerpoint on Tissues from Mr.Lowe
Anatomy Resources
Extensive PowerPoint over the 4 Tissues of the human body , pictures, and videos. Worksheet to go along with it.

Reading – Why Do I Have Bones? from Peter Dublin
Anatomy Resources
Why Do I Have Bones is a science skill associated with the Kindergarten-Grade 1 Life Science topic of the Human Body. Included are an e-Book and five interactive activities that focus on constructing a story, understanding, vocabulary, spelling, and sentence building. Each of the interactive activities provides elementary school students with a different way of acquiring this important reading skill.

All of these software activities are available in a browser. You must have Internet access to play them (you do not need a special application to open this file type as any browser will run it).

Human Body Orientation from Tracy Bergen
Anatomy Resources
Human body organ systems with anatomical terminology. Total of 21 slides

monstered_sig

 

 


Privacy and Disclosure

STEAM Kids Book Review

This post may contain affiliate links which help support my family. Thank you for stopping by.

STEAM Kids

STEAM Kids – Hands-on Projects for Kids

STEAM Kids is an E-book dedicated to over 50 science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics hands-on projects for kids. I printed out and bound the e-book for the kids to page through with me. The excitement on their faces was infectious! They are super excited to work their way though this book.
STEAM Kids
STEAM Kids is all about inspiring our next generation of inventors, innovators and leaders to question like a scientist, design like a technologist, build like an engineer, create like an artist, deduce like a mathematician and play like a kid.
STEAM Kids
This book was written by these amazing bloggers:
Anne Carey from Left Brain Craft Brain
Ana Dziengel from Babble Dabble do
Amber Scardino from Wee Warhols
Chelsey Marashain from Buggy and Buddy
Dayna Abraham from Lemon Lime Adventures
Erica Clark from What Do We Do All Day?
Jamie Hand from Handmade Kids Art
Karyn Tripp from Teach Beside Me
Leslie Manlapig from Pink Stripey Socks
Malia Hallowell from Playdough to Plato
PR Newton from STEAM Powered Family
STEAM Kids

What I Love About This Book

This book has an amazing array of activities that your kids will love. Each activity comes with a complete list of materials required for that activity as well as a difficulty rating that gives you an indication which activities you can do with different ages.
STEAM Kids
At the back of the book, they have an eleven plag Activity Planner that provides week-long activity guides as well as shopping lists to make those hands-on learning opportunities easy for you.
STEAM Kids

You can download the FREE PRINTABLE, 52 STEAM Challenges for Creative Kids, HERE.

ONE WEEK ONLY – 2 Books for the Price of 1!

STEAM Kids

Purchase the books Individually Below

STEAM Kids
STEAM Kids
STEAM Kids
STEAM Kids

monstered_sig

 

 

Privacy and Disclosure

Year Round Homeschooling: Hands-On Science Experiment: Rock Candy

This post may contain affiliate links which help support my family. Thank you for stopping by.

201507 rock candy

Click on the above image to read this month’s contribution on Year Round Homeschooling. Who doesn’t love making candy? And what better way to include something you love into a science lesson! This month we made ROCK CANDY! I found this experiment idea over at Wiki How. I tweaked it a bit to…/em>

monstered_sig

 

 

Privacy and Disclosure