Curriculum Choices 2018

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curriculum choices 2018

curriculum choices 2018
I’m often asked what our Curriculum Choices are for this year. In short, we follow the Cambridge International Primary Curriculum for our core subjects. We then added a few other programs that suit us and the kidlets’ learning styles. We are currently in our 3rd year of using this curriculum and are very happy with it.
curriculum choices 2018
In addition to the Core Cambridge Primary curriculum, I also purchased the Keys to Learning Boxes for each child. I use them as reinforcement as the kidlets are all visual learners and this has helped us quite a bit to get the concepts ingrained.

Keys to Learning focuses on basic literacy, numeracy and mathematics skills, and can be used for the consolidation of skills in the mainstream classroom – as well as for remedial work at earlier levels.
Click on the image below to find out more about the Keys to Learning program.
curriculum choices 2018

Koko is currently doing the Stage 5 curriculum. These are the books he is currently working on. We use a combination of Cambridge for the core subjects and the CAPS (the South African curriculum):

English
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Activity book

 

 

 

 

Phonics in a Box Workbook. We use this book for dictionary work.

 

 

 

 

Mathematics
Teachers Manual

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Games book

 

 

 

 

Science
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Activity book

 

 

 

 

Life Skills
CAPS Workbook

Afrikaans
CAPS Workbook

Fifi is currently doing the Stage 3 curriculum. These are the books she is currently working on. We use a combination of Cambridge for the core subjects and the CAPS (the South African curriculum):

English
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Activity book

 

 

 

 

Phonics in a Box Workbook. We use this book for dictionary work.

 

 

 

 

Mathematics
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Games book

 

 

 

 
Science
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 

Activity book

 

 

 

 

Life Skills
CAPS Workbook

Afrikaans
CAPS Workbook

Pixie is currently doing the Stage 1 curriculum. These are the books she is currently working on. We use a combination of Cambridge for the core subjects and the CAPS (the South African curriculum):

English
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 

Learners Book

 

 

 

 
Activity book

 

 

 

 

Phonics Workbook B. She completed Workbook A last year.

 

 

 

 
Phonics in a Box Workbook.

 

 

 

 
Mathematics
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 
Learners Book

 

 

 

 
Games book

 

 

 

 
Science
Teachers Manual

 

 

 

 
Learners Book

 

 

 

 
Activity book

 

 

 

 
Life Skills
CAPS Workbook

Afrikaans
CAPS Workbook

The girls are currently using the Rainbow Reading Curriculum.

Rainbow Reading is a graded reading series for primary schools. It provides a wealth of original stories and factual texts, which will help learners to develop the reading skills and vocabulary they need to meet the requirements of the curriculum in all learning areas. All 350 titles in the series are written by South African authors. Rainbow Reading motivates young readers to become fluent readers, because it allows them to choose stories that they want to read and to read at their own level.

Fifi is currently using Rainbow Reading Level 3.

The books in Level 3 can be used in any grade in the Foundation Phase, but they are best suited to seven- to nine-year-old learners in Grade 2 or Grade 3. Many of the learners will be learning English as a First Additional Language. Most children at this level have started to read and some may be reading quite well already. They should be able to recognise sight words and decode unfamiliar words.

Level 3 Rainbow Reading books are 16 pages long. The stories are based on familiar objects and actions and the characters include children typical of those in the target age group. The artwork is a very important part of each text at this level, as it supports reading and helps the emerging readers to make sense of the stories. The artwork provides cludes, which help the readers to decode and recognise words. Text is consistently placed to help learners to become confident about reading books.

There are three types of texts at this level:

Read Aloud stories (fiction) 250-400 total words
Read Alone stories (fiction) 250-400 total words
Factual (non-fiction) texts 250-400 total words
Each boxed set in Level 3 contains a comprehensive teacher’s guide, which provides valuable support for teaching reading and book skills, and includes specific support for each title, including phonics, oral skills, high-frequency words and key oral vocabulary, as well as suggested activities.”

Pixie is currently using Rainbow Reading Level 1/.

The books in Rainbow Reading Level 1 can be used in any grade in the Foundation Phase, but they are best suited to five- and six-year-old learners in Grade R or Grade 1. Many of the learners will be learning English as a First Additional Language. Most children at this level will not be able to read by themselves in any language, and some of the children will be handling books for the first time.

Level 1 Rainbow Reading books are eight pages long. The stories are based on familiar objects and actions and the characters include children typical of those in the target age group. The artwork is very important part of each text at this level, as it supports reading and helps the emerging readers to make sense of the stories. The pictures tell the story. Text is consistently placed to help learners become confident about reading books.

There are three types of texts at this level:

Read Aloud stories (fiction) Maximum 50 words
Read Alone stories (fiction) Maximum 20 words
Factual (non-fiction) texts Maximum 20 words
Each boxed set in Level 1 contains a comprehensive teacher’s guide, which provides valuable support for teaching reading skills, and includes specific support for each title, including phonics, oral skills, high-frequency words and key oral vocabulary, as well as suggested activities.”

History is a group lesson here. We use the Story of the World curriculum and love it. We work through each chapter thoroughly and have sometimes spent a month on a chapter that may only be 2 pages long. I let the children drive this part of our lessons as they generally ask a ton of more indepth questions than I expect.

Each Friday, the kidlets do a research project, these often take up to 3 weeks to complete (depending on the work). They choose the topic and we work together to get all the information for them. They then create a poster of all they have learned. So far we have learned about the food pyramid, the importance of vitamins and kangaroos. Our next project is Fifi’s choice.

One of the first questions we get asked is, “Do your children do exams and assessments?” The easy answer is yes. I download the Annual National Assessments from the Department of Basic Education’s website. The kidlets do them and I mark them. I have these on hand should we ever need them for some reason.

The Annual National Assessments (ANA) are standardised national assessments for languages and mathematics in the senior phase (grades 7 – 9), intermediate phase (grades 4 – 6) and in literacy and numeracy for the foundation phase (grades 1 – 3). The question papers and marking memoranda (exemplars) are supplied by the national Department of Basic Education and the schools manage the conduct of the tests as well as the marking and internal moderation.

With regards to exams, we don’t do official exams. The kidlets are assessed as to their knowledge during each lesson, if they don’t understand the concept of the lesson, we don’t move on. That is one HUGE benefit of homeschooling. Once all the work for the year has been completed, we move onto the next grade.

I also often get asked about the legalities of homeschooling in South Africa. I am not a lawyer and don’t pretend to have the answers. My suggestion is that you visit the Pestalozzi Trust website. They have all the information available to the public.

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Freebie Friday Linkup: Poetry Resources

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Poetry Resources

Poems of Robert Louis Stevenson: Volume 1 {FREE PRINTABLE!} from Wildflower Ramblings
Poetry Resources
Here is the free printable! Poems of Robert Louis Stevenson: Volume 1.

Free Educational Resources: 6 Nature Handbooks, 10-week Poetry Course, Maps + More from The Happy Housewife
Poetry Resources
Sometimes in homeschooling you need a little something to get you through the week! That is what this weekly post is all about. Every Saturday I will post educational freebies to get you excited about another week of learning. Enjoy!

Poetry Study from Homeschool Share
Poetry Resources
For grades 2-5
Unit and notebooking pages prepared by Jimmie

This unit is based on the folllowing book– Random House Book of Poetry for Children: A Treasury of 572 Poems for Today’s Child selected by Jack Prelutsky, illustrated by Arnold Lobel
ISBN: 0394850106

Structure of poem study for each poem:
Read the title and poem aloud while the children listen.
Ask them what they heard – this is narration. They tell back all they understood from the poem. This may include the topic, descriptions, specific words and images.
Read the poem again, and repeat the narration.
Hopefully this time the children can offer even more details.
Allow them to ask questions about things that are still unclear.
You can ask specific questions of the poem as well if you want to draw out certain aspects of the poem. For more help, use this Responding to Poetry handout. This is also where you will insert the questions listed below in the unit study.
The child can read the poem aloud now, if you desire.

For each theme, there are at least two choices of notebooking pages. The child can copy the appropriate poem onto the themed paper for handwriting practice or for copywork.

Poetry Lapbook from Homeschool Share
Poetry Resources
Poetry Lapbook
created by Leslie Cardwell

Here’s a Little Poetry Unit from Homeschool Share
Poetry Resources
Here’s a Little Poetry Unit is based on Here’s a Little Poem
collected by Jane Yolen and Andrew Fusek Peters
Unit Prepared by Ami Brainerd

I prepared this unit to use in April with my son who will be at the end of his Kindergarten year. This book has huge appeal for the younger set (PK-1), but some of the activities here could be used with your older students as well. I added a few ideas at the very end of the unit for older students.

This unit isn’t found in any of our regular indexes because it’s different. You can use it as an add-on to your other daily lessons. I wanted it to be a light, fun, fresh unit to introduce my son to the basics of poetry. I hope it will inspire you and your students; I hope it will draw you into the wonderful world that is poetry.

Please plan this unit in advance as many of the lesson extensions require supplies you may not have on hand (like big boxes!).

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Hearts for Home Blog Hop #73 ~ Language Arts

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The Hearts for Home Blog Hop is a weekly blog hop that begins every Thursday morning. The theme of this blog hop is showing that our hearts are for our homes.Post topics include: homeschooling, marriage, parenting, homemaking, faith, budgeting, crafts, DIY projects and more! We would love to see you link up your posts. We feature the most popular post and a few of our favorites every week! Will you be one of the next Featured Bloggers?

Not a blogger? That’s okay! This blog hop will be your one stop location to finding ideas and inspiration for fulfilling your role as a wife, mother and follower of Christ. We are so glad you have stopped by!

Meet my cohosts here!

Featured blogger with the most clicks last week ~ Free Alphabet Coloring Pages (Live Over C’s)
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Latin Introduction (Grammarlings)
2

Lapbooks and Literature (Year Round Homeschooling)
3

10 Fun Learning Games To Play With Alphabet Letters (Midwest Modern Momma)
4

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HEARTS FOR HOME BLOG HOP GUIDELINES

Welcome! Please make sure to link directly to your post (not your main blog page) so we can find the fabulous post you want to share. Each week we will select someone’s blog link up that our readers “clicked” with the most and share some of my favorite posts that were linked up! Thank you!

Hearts for Home @ Monsters Ed Homeschooling Academy

 

Please make sure to display our Hearts for Home button on your blog post, sidebar or tabs. This button can be found on the blog hop each week. Kindly make sure to visit some of the other wonderful bloggers who have linked up here. Were you featured on our Hearts for Home Blog Hop? Congratulations! Grab a Featured button to proudly display on your blog or website.

Hearts for Home @ Monsters Ed Homeschooling Academy

 

We invite everyone to get “clicking” and have some blog hopping fun!

We have created a Pinterest Board so that we can help spread the word on the blog’s that have had featured posts on our Hearts for Home Blog Hop. Make sure to stop by and check it out HERE.


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Guest Post: The ABCs of Sight Words

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Sight word instruction is a highly recommended supplement to a conventional phonics curriculum. Children can use phonics to decode most of the words they come across, but knowing sight words can enhance their reading speed and fluency.

Sight words are vocabulary words that are essentially memorized, so a child can recognize them by sight. There are two types of sight words: high-frequency words, or words that show up a lot in written English, and non-phonetic words, which can’t be decoded using the rules of phonics. The two most commonly used lists of sight words are the Dolch and Fry sight word lists, developed by two different educational scholars.

A word cloud of all the Dolch sight words.

A word cloud of all the Dolch sight words.

The best way to learn sight words is through numerous repetitions of each word—seeing it, hearing it, saying it, spelling it, and writing it. At SightWords.com we recommend using a variety of simple teaching techniques to introduce new sight words to your child as well as review old words. In just ten minutes, you can introduce three to five new sight words using the full range of teaching techniques.

But the repetition does not need to be dull and drill-like! After a quick lesson to introduce and teach a few new sight words, use a game to reinforce has your child has just learned. One day’s sight word instruction time can include ten minutes of lesson time followed by twenty minutes of game time. A sight words game provides many opportunities for more repetitions of the words, but wrapped up in a fun variation of a classic kid’s game!

A favorite game at SightWords.com is Fly Swat, sometimes called Splat. Children get to work out some of that squirmy, wiggly kid energy using fly swatters to “swat” the sight words flies. The trick is that they must read the word correctly before the fly can go “splat”! It can be played with an adult and one child or with a classroom full of kids.

Sight Words Fly Swat is a great educational game for active young children.

Sight Words Fly Swat is a great educational game for active young children.

Other sight word games range from Dominoes to Go Fish to a sight words variation of Candy Land. Your child may prefer one or two games over the others. And some games let you focus the child’s attention on a smaller or larger number of vocabulary words. A popular feature of the SightWords.com games is that they are all customizable—you can supplement or even replace a list of Dolch or Fry words with your own custom words!

We believe we have created a website with a fun, easy-to-use, and FREE curriculum for sight words instruction. Hopefully this has answered some of your questions about sight words. You can now take this knowledge and help your children make the most of their early education!

Margo Edwards holds degrees from Rice University and George Washington University and is the Director of Content Development at SightWords.com, a website dedicated to providing free resources—from lessons to flashcards to games—to promote child literacy. SightWords.com is proud to be sponsored by the Georgia Preschool Association.

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12 Months of Montessori Learning ~ March: Language Arts

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12 months of montessori learning

 

I have had a few people ask me how they could use the Montessori method to introduce their children to language arts and how to teach grammar using this method. Since we follow a rather eclectic homeschooling style and not solely Montessori, I had to do a bit of research.

Montessori Curriculum Explained: Language Arts Materials, Activities and Philosophy

Language is the central point of difference between the human species and all others. Language lies at the root of that transformation of the environment that we call civilization…Language is an instrument of collective thought…Hence, language is truly the expression of a kind of super intelligence. ~ Maria Montessori, The Absorbent Mind.

Montessori believed that language is innate and it is in the nature of humans to express themselves both orally and through the written word. The Montessori Language Arts curriculum, therefore, starts the moment the child first enters the environment. Enjoy this in depth look as we explain Montessori Language Arts curriculum materials, activities, and philosophy.

Montessori Language: Ages 0-3

Montessori believed that the sensitive period for language begins at birth and continues to about six years of age. From birth, the child has been absorbing the sounds and speech patterns of family and home environment. Long before being able to speak, the child listened intently while acquiring the sounds of her native language. Babies learn to recognize and repeat the individual sounds of their language and toddlers learn to recognize, name, and pronounce the names of objects in their environment. In the Montessori Infant/Toddler environment, daily exposure to language through conversations and the reading of good literature helps the child strengthen her vocabulary and increases independence as she becomes more cognizant of the world around her, giving her the ability to name her wishes and desires.

Montessori Language: Ages 3-6

The Montessori 3-6 classroom is a natural extension of the patterns of communication that have already been absorbed. Through every conversation, every book read aloud, every new word that is taught, the Montessori student is learning language, and thus, learning to read. In the Montessori Preschool/Kindergarten environment, emphasis is placed on the process of acquiring language. Knowledge is constructed by mental and physical activity rather than on passive learning. Writing is taught before reading through the direct and indirect aims of the Montessori Practical Life and Sensorial works. In the Montessori 3-6 Language curriculum, writing itself is seen as a direct preparation for reading.

Montessori parents and educators use precise language that is neither too simplified or given to baby-talk in order to give credence to the work the child is doing to acquire vocabulary and language skills. As Montessori educators, we help the child to focus her attention to the sound of her own speech, making fine distinctions between sounds. From our attention in oral language development emerges the child’s need to write. Written symbols are introduced and from there, the child bursts spontaneously into reading.

Montessori Language: Ages 6-12

From infancy, children have learned the names of things. In the lower elementary Montessori classroom, students begin to analyze more abstract concepts of language: the how, the why, and the from where? Montessori elementary students explore the history of language, written language, spoken language, literature and grammar, and syntax.

The Montessori Fourth Great Lesson is the story of how writing began. This impressionistic story grabs the attention of young students who are eager to learn about those who came before us. From there, they listen to and read great literature and are further motivated to tell their own stories through creative writing, reports, drama, poetry, and song.

Throughout this work, Montessori students are introduced to the rules of human communication through word studies, work with the Montessori Grammar Boxes, as well as beginning logical sentence analysis. The goal in the Montessori elementary Language curriculum is not to teach grammar but to give a concrete representation and foster a love of the function of words.

Dr. Montessori described the role of language in traditional education as forcing children speak and write when they have nothing to say. She said instead, that “The child must create his interior life before he can express anything; he must take spontaneously from the external world constructive material in order to ‘compose’; he must exercise his intelligence fully before he can be ready to find the logical connection between things. We ought to offer the child that which is necessary for his internal life and leave him free to produce.” (Spontaneous Activity in Education). By unlimited exposure in the Montessori environment, we free the child’s creative and imaginative process, giving her the means to write and tell her own story. – (North American Montessori Center – Montessori Teacher Training )

 

Here are some ideas, all found online (links have been provided) that follow the Montessori Method for teaching Language Arts.

Compound Word Matching (Montessori Album)
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In this activity the child matches pair of cards with the beginnings and ends of compound words.

St. Patrick’s Day Phonological Awareness (Trillium Montessori)
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This set is ideal for a PreK-K Montessori class but can be adapted for most early childhood and K-2 classrooms. It will also be useful for RTI, SLP and Special Ed teachers.

Included are printable cards for the following Phonological Awareness activities with a St. Patrick’s Day theme:
Activity 1: Word Awareness Poem and Sequencing Cards
Activity 2: Rhyming Riddles
Activity 3: Beginning Sounds Build-a-Shamrock
Activity 4: Ending Sounds I-Spy Bingo
Activity 5: Middle Sounds Vowel Sorting
Activity 6: Phoneme Segmenting and Blending
Activity 7: Phoneme Substitution

Teach Your Child to Read (Montessori Early Reading) (Natural Beach Living)
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Teaching your child to read is probably one thing that every homeschooling parent worries about. Not only homeschoolers, but probably every parent in general. Of course as parents we want our children to be great readers, to love books and to love learning. I think parents these days are much more active in researching and in trying to learn the best ways possible for our children to be successful in life. By successful I am saying we all want our children to be happy, to feel good about themselves, and to thrive in this world. I hope being here with me today makes it easier on you and gives you the tools that will get your child reading and having a love for books.

Building Words with the Movable Alphabet (Totschool)
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The Movable Alphabet is a set of letters that allow children to build words before they have started either writing or reading. It is a very classic and well-known piece of Montessori work.

Simple DIY Building Words Center (Apples and ABC’s)
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I made sure that the letters to choose from, were letters that could build a real word in the “at” family. For differentiation, you could challenge them and have all sorts of letters to choose from, that wouldn’t necessarily make a real word.

Cookie Sheet Activities Pre K- K Bundle- Early Literacy and Numeracy Activities (Make, Take, Teach)
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There are 6 volumes of cookie sheet activities each volume targeting a specific skill. Just to keep it simple, I combined the volumes into two grade level bundles- one bundle for my Pre K- K friends and another for my first grade friends. Volumes 1, 2 and 4 comprise the Make, Take & Teach Pre K- K Bundle.

The Cookie Sheet Challenge! (Make, Take, Teach)
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ABC Order. In this activity, the students are given magnetic letters and they simply put the letters in order. For students who will have difficulty putting all the letters in order, differentiate the activity by placing several letters in strategic positions on the cookie sheet first.

Rhyming Ice Cream Cones (Make, Take, Teach)
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These rhyming ice cream cones have certainly been a hit with our little preschoolers and kindergarteners! The activity is easily differentiated as you can choose how many rhyming cones and scoops to use. For those kiddos just learning the concept of rhyme, you’ll likely want to start with just 2 cones and gradually add more cones as they become proficient with the skill. For those students who just need added practice, you can use more cones and just place them in an independent work center. When you download this activity, you’ll receive 18 rhyming cones with 60 rhyming scoops!

10 CVC word activities (Study at Home Mama)
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I have 10 great ideas for playing with and sounding out CVC words with your Montessori preschooler, and I love incorporating different materials and approaches to keep up the enthusiasm with a new challenge, but feel free to just choose your favourite activity and stick with that. The most important thing in learning anything via the Montessori Method is allowing and encouraging repetition — so if you’re going to exclusively do the play dough idea at the bottom the list, make sure that play dough and alphabet stamps are constantly available for your child to revisit that work.

DIY Montessori Sound Object Box (The Kavanaugh Report)
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A sound object box was perfect since it combined small objects {another favorite for Henry} and letter sounds.

Matching Sandpaper Letters to Moveable Alphabet (The Learning Ark – Elementary Montessori)
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Once your child has learnt about 85% of the letters in the alphabet, they’re ready to move on. You continue the three period lesson with sandpaper
letters, but you also start using the moveable alphabet.

Sorting Baskets Phonics Activity (The Imagination Tree)
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Set up a fun phonics activity for preschoolers and school aged children with this sorting objects into baskets game! This takes no preparation at all and can be played in different ways to suit the age or stage of each child involved.

Rhyming Pairs Basket Literacy Game (The Imagination Tree)
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Make a simple rhyming activity to help practise rhyming pairs and learn about literacy in a playful, hands-on way! This would be great for both home and the classroom as a go-to resource on the shelf.

Teaching Toddlers the Alphabet (This Reading Mama)
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One of my literacy goals in the younger years (with toddlers and preschoolers) is to help them build a solid foundation of letters and letter sounds so they can build on that for later reading and spelling. You may think I’m crazy. Teaching toddlers the alphabet? Aren’t they too young? But teaching toddlers the alphabet does not necessarily need to look like “teaching”. There’s no desk. No workbook or letter of the week formula. What you will find is lots of intentional play and literacy integration/immersion throughout the day through multiple and meaningful exposure.

Alphabet Scavenger Hunt with Beginning Sounds (This Reading Mama)
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This school year, we’ve explored the alphabet in many playful ways (mostly in our every day routine, but also with paint, with my Pre-K/K Packs, and various alphabet matching games, like our most recent LEGO matching.)

Alphabet Sensory Play (Pre-K Pages)
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Research supports teaching the alphabet through fun, meaningful, hands-on activities. This activity combines sensory play with letter identification and visual discrimination.

Tulip Words – Reading Activity for Preschoolers (Little Family Fun)
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This week we’re doing a “Spring” theme in our Preschool@Home, and this is our first activity!
I just made this and haven’t done it with LB(3) yet, but I know it will be fun for him, and a good way to review letter sounds and to begin teaching him how letters make words.

Play with Words: A Pretend Bakery Game (Education.com)
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Tie on that apron. Break out the mixing bowls. If your child loves to play pretend, and needs practice with letters and the sounds they make, get cooking with this activity! Not only is it playful fun, but it builds key reading skills.

Montessori Pink Series Reading Work (Making Montessori Ours)
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Our pink series three part cards are kept in simple folders. I used scrape book paper cut to size folder up the bottom and with a long arm stapler (LOVE this thing) secured the sections. I have a label on the outside.

 

The Montessori Alphabet Box has always intrigued me. I have been wanting to put one together for the kids, but just haven’t gotten to it. I really need to get off of my laurels and get it done! The kids would love this!

DIY Mini Montessori Alphabet Box (Stir the Wonder)
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A DIY Mini Montessori Alphabet Box is an affordable way to create a hands-on learning tool to help your preschooler learn the letters and sounds of the alphabet. I’ve wanted to make one for some time now! This summer I finally started to gather my supplies and put it together just in time for the beginning of this school year. Now that we’ve had a chance to use it I’m so excited to finally share it with you all!

How to Use the Montessori Alphabet Box (Wildflower Ramblings)
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Each letter has its own little box full of objects that begin with that sound. Today, I am happy to show you how to use all the little boxes full of tiny objects that help create phonemic awareness for little ones.

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Recommended reading:
The Absorbent Mind by Maria Montessori
The Montessori Method by Montessori Maria
Teach Your Preschooler To Read & Write by John Bowman
Help Your Preschooler Build a Better Brain: A Complete Guide to Doing Montessori Early Learning at Home by John Bowman

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12 Months of Montessori Learning Posts:
January: Practical Life
February: Geography

2014/2015 Curriculum ~ Our final decision

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We have finally come to a decision on what curriculum we’ll be using in the next school year for Koko, Fifi and Pixie.

Pixie will continue with Totschool.

Language Arts

English

Fifi will continue with the Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons program by Siegfried Engelmann, Phyllis Haddox, Elaine Bruner. This program has worked well for both Noo and Koko, who are both avid readers.
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About the Author
Siegfried Engelmann is a professor of education at the University of Oregon, and has written many books on teaching, including Give Your Child a Superior Mind. He is the originator of Direct Instruction, the most successful approach to teaching, and he has developed more than fifty Direct Instruction programs.
www.zigsite.com

As soon as Fifi has finished the Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons, she’ll start on the Learning Language Arts through Literature Blue Set (Grade 1 Level). The curriculum consists of the LLATL Blue Set (Incl. Student Book), Who Took the Farmer’s Hat, Goodnight Moon, The Story of Ferdinand, Caps for Sale, The Snowy Day, Bedtime for Frances, The Little House, Old Hat New Hat, Make Way for Ducklings, Blueberries for Sal, Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel, The Runaway Bunny and Tale of Peter Rabbit.
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Koko will be working on the Learning Language Arts through Literature Red Set. The curriculum consists of the LLATL Red Set (Incl. Student Book), A Tree is Nice, Little Bear, Balto, The Fire Cat, Ox-Cart Man, Corduroy, The Little Island, Billy and Blaze, Harry the Dirty Dog and Abraham Lincoln.
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Afrikaans

Koko and Fifi will both be starting Afrikaans as a subject next year. We will start off with Afrikaans – Geniet Dit! – Werkboek 1 and work our way up to Afrikaans Sonder Grense 2nd language (Teachers Manual available here). Neither child can speak or understand the language, so we are going to start off with teaching the basics.
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Mathematics

Fifi will be using the Math-U-See Primer (Grades 0-1 Skill Level) next year. I’ve head great things about this curriculum. The curriculum consists of the Primer – Instruction Manual & DVD and the Primer – Student Workbook.

Koko will be using the Math-U-See Alpha Grade 2 Skill Level next year. The curriculum consists of the Alpha – Instruction Manual & DVD’s and the Alpha – Student Workbook & Test Book.

I’ve purchased the Math-U-See Skip Counting – CD and Songbook and Manipulative Blocks separately. I need to order another Manipulative Block for when the kids work at the same time
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Writing

We will be using the Italic Handwriting Series for writing. This curriculum comes with a Teachers Manual that helps a ton, Fifi will be using the Italic A and Koko will be using Italic B books and Italic C books.
Screenshot from 2014-10-14 21:44:27

Life Skills

Fifi will be working on the Life Skills 1 workbook and Koko will be working on the Life Skills 2 workbook.
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Science

Koko and Fifi will be working on science together. I have decided on the Hands-on Science Foundation Phase (Grades 0-3) book. It comes complete with worksheets and experiment suggestions for each lesson.
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In addition to Hands-on Science, Koko will be working on different space worksheets (available here, here and, coming soon, here) to foster his love for all this astronomy related.

History

Koko and Fifi will be working on Story of the World together. The curriculum consists of Test Book Vol. 1: The Ancient Times, Activity Book, Vol 1: The Ancient Times, 7 CD Audio Set Vol. 1: The Ancient Times and Hardcover Text, Vol. 1: The Ancient Times. The curriculum has been ordered, now we play the waiting game till it arrives.
3

Geography

Koko and Fifi will be working on the Pack Your Bags! Monthly Lapbook Series and Children of the World Pack, both from Enchanted Homeschooling Mom, together.
12

Arts and Crafts

The children receive a monthly arts and crafts kit from Kidazzle Kids Club. These kits are awesome. Pixie will start getting a kit every month from January.
4

Additional Activities

In addition to the above curricula, Fifi will also be working on the Kindergarten Literature Based Unit Studies from 1+1+1=1. I’m slowly purchasing all these books.
Kindergarten-Literature-Unit-Printables

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